At NCSA Athletic Recruiting we identify, evaluate, and activate qualified and committed student-athletes into the largest, most trusted, and verified network for 42,000 college coaches and the top athletes in the country.

Driven be the mission of athleadership, NCSA is exclusive athletic recruiting network that educates, assists, and connects families, coaches and companies, they can save time and money, get ahead and give back.

Recruiting Tip of the Day

Initiating communication with coaches is seen as a daunting task. Restrictions might at first suggest that the student-athlete is hand-cuffed until the end of his junior year if wanting to establish a relationship with a Division I or II coach. Fortunately, the rules allow a tremendous amount of recruiting to occur during a student-athlete’s freshman and sophomore years. While D1 or 2 coaches cannot call and initiate communication with underclassmen, they can invite prospects to call with the initial letter and questionnaire. They can include a direct line or cell phone number and encourage a prospect to call them if they have any questions.

Ask our Scouting Team a Question- 1-800-977-9149

Recruiting Profile: http://bit.ly/BeRecruited

Recruiting Tip of the Day 

Sometimes the trickiest place for a student-athlete to be is the gray middle ground with enough talent to earn some cursory interest from schools but not enough to be pursued heavily. Most of these athletes lose out on potential scholarship money because they are unrealistic about their lot in the athletic world, and they believe they are being more heavily recruited than they really are. Don’t sit by the phone or mailbox waiting to hear from coaches that are not going to call.

Ask our Scouting Team a Question- 1-800-977-9149

Recruiting Profile: http://bit.ly/BeRecruited

Recruiting Tip of the Day

When applying to a college that is recruiting a student-athlete, the student should always ask for an application waiver. The normal cost to apply for admission ranges from $25 to $250, which can be costly, especially if an athlete is applying to multiple universities. Asking a coach for an application waiver lets the coach know that the student knows how to play the game. In turn, it lets the student-athlete know how interested the coach is. If the coach is willing to help a student-athlete with the admissions process, this is a GOOD indication the coach is interested in the athlete.

Ask our Scouting Team a Question- 1-800-977-9149

Recruiting Profile: http://bit.ly/BeRecruited

The Rise in the Cost of College 

The cost of college has risen more than 1200% in the last few decades and students are graduating with more debt than ever (over $26,000 on average). And not every athletic scholarship covers the full cost of attending college. In equivalency sports, coaches may split one full ride scholarship between multiple athletes. Some divisions are limited in how they can give out aid. Even top-tier Division I athletes have to worry about the cost of books, food, gas, and other day-to-day expenses.

So how can you fill in those gaps, save parents’ checkbooks, and keep students out of debt after they graduate? Here are 4 steps every athlete can take to make sure they get all the financial aid they can.

Qualify

If you want to earn any kind of financial aid, you’ll need to qualify for it. That means:
Earning a solid GPA and standardized test scores (you’ll need these to qualify to play sports, too – make sure to review the NCAA qualifying standards)

Acting with integrity. Many students and athletes have lost a scholarships (or even admission) because of something dumb they did on their own time. The rise of social media means it’s easier than ever for what you do to become public
Finding aid opportunities – there are lots of websites (like scholarships.com) where you can sort through scholarships, grants, and other aid. You can also ask your high school guidance counselors and the financial aid offices of any colleges where you are applying

Find the right school

Some schools cost a lot more than others – but the education (and the quality of the sports programs) don’t always match up. Overall, public schools tend to cost less than private schools, especially if you can pay in-state tuition. But many private schools offer generous financial aid packages – and remember that there’s a lot more to consider when picking a college than just financial aid and scholarships.

Athletic scholarships

The focus here is on the ways athletes can supplement their sports scholarships, but athletic scholarships are our passion and I couldn’t help but mention them. Building a recruiting profile, connecting with coaches, taking official visits, and negotiating scholarship offers are all key to earning an athletic scholarship. Check here to see how many scholarship opportunities and programs exist for each sport.
Non-athletic Scholarships. Even the most committed college athletes can often use some extra scholarship dollars, and some schools (like Division III institutions or the Ivy League) do not technically offer athletic scholarships at all – instead, athletes rely on leadership, academic, community service, and other scholarships. Coaches can often help athletes find these opportunities through the financial aid office.

Be sure to check for other scholarships, too, including those that aren’t so obvious – many religious and ethnic associations offer scholarships, as do community service groups like the Boy Scouts and Rotary Club. Some colleges even have scholarships for people with a certain last name.

An sports scholarship can be at the heart of an athlete’s strategy to pay for college. But by being smart and exploring other opportunities, you can supplement that scholarship and bring your costs even lower. Combining the respect that employers have for college athletes with a low student debt load, you can be in a great professional and financial position the day you put on that cap and gown and get out into the real world.

Learn even more: http://bit.ly/I34a5R

Woodstock High School 14 year old Freshman Commits to Loyola-Marymount

It isn’t the first time you’ve heard NCSA say that recruiting starts early- and while the NCAA still prevents coaches from talking to most athletes on the phone until September 1st of their senior year that doesn’t mean the recruiting process should start then. The recruiting process starts early, and it has only continued to accelerate in the past few years- we even recently posted an article about Dylan Moses a 2017 football player who had two offers from Alabama and LSU by the time he was 13, and recently committed to LSU as a Freshmen in high school. However this time we are talking about Breanna Roper a 14 year old softball player from Georgia who recently committed to division 1 Ivy League school Loyola-Marymount. Read the story on Breanna below!

By Michael Carve
It’s rare when a high school freshman gets a “committable” scholarship from a college and is allowed to accept it quickly.
That happened this week when Woodstock High School pitcher/outfielder Breanna Roper says she was both offered and accepted a softball scholarship from Loyola-Marymount University.
“It’s just an opportunity that I couldn’t pass up,” Breanna told the AJC. “It’s Loyola. It’s like an Ivy League school. It’s a D1 school. It’s in Los Angeles, California. Because of all those factors, I couldn’t pass it up.”

Why did Roper feel the need to commit super early? “There wasn’t any pressure. It was just the factors of the school. I didn’t see any reason to wait longer. It was my decision. My family and I talked it over. A ton of factors went into play.”

The 14-year-old has never seen the Loyola-Marymount campus nor met with the coaches in-person, but she and her family plan to fly to California in a few weeks for an unofficial visit (Colleges won’t be able to pay for visits until her senior year, per NCAA rules).
“They offered me last Sunday, and I committed a day after,” Roper said. “The coach already said if I go there and I don’t like the campus, I can de-commit. But it’s kind of an unspoken rule once you verbally commit somewhere, you don’t really re-commit somewhere else.”

The father of the freshman sensation supports the early decision, even though she’s four years away from enrolling in a college.
“We’re excited for her,” James Roper said. “It was just too good of an opportunity to pass up. It met all the requirements for a school she wanted to go to. Why wait two years when her dream school wants her to commit now?”

Roper committed to Loyola-Marymount over BYU-Hawaii. She also had interest from Oregon, Temple, and Seton Hall, according to her father.

Loyola-Marymount has yet to scout Roper in person, but it apparently was impressed enough after watching her film on a softball website and from talking to other coaches to go ahead and extend the offer.

“It was a tough decision because BYU-Hawaii offered me a spot, too,” Breanna said. “I was trying to consider which school to go. But Loyola was Division I. It was definitely nerve-wracking. I was actually on the crying with the BYU-Hawaii coaches on the phone while telling them I was going to commit to Loyola.”

Roper made her debut on Woodstock’s varsity this season. As a pitcher, she had a 12-7 record with a 1.87 ERA, while striking out 33 batters in 82.1 innings. Her fastball has been clocked as high as 63 mph. Roper is a left-handed hitter who posted .290 batting average. She is being recruited as a pitcher-outfielder.

“Yes, this is very unusual to commit as a freshman,” Woodstock coach Kortney Dempsey said. “I think she’s a great athlete. I hope this is what really wants and gets after it. I hope she continues to exceed in softball, and goes there and does the same.”
Roper, who also plays for the East Cobb Bullets travel team, comes from a baseball family. Her great-grandfather, Sam Vick, played as am outfielder for the New York Yankees and Boston Red Sox from 1917 to 1921.

Note: Verbal offers from colleges and verbal commitments from student-athletes are both non-binding. Nothing will be official until Roper signs college scholarship papers as a high school senior.

Learn even more: http://bit.ly/IeybyL

Recruiting Tip of the Day 

An athletic profile should be an accurate representation of the student’s abilities and statistics. Some student-athletes are tempted to over-exaggerate their abilities, height, or weight in an attempt to make them more attractive candidates for a spot on a college team. This is a big mistake. College coaches are already skeptical about resumes because they are self-reported. If one piece of information is incorrect, coaches will assume all of it is false. Coaches will eventually discover the athlete’s actual abilities and stats which will most likely eliminate them from future consideration.

Ask our Scouting Team a Question- 1-800-977-9149

Recruiting Profile: http://bit.ly/BeRecruited

Recruiting Tip of the Day 

Seniors it is not too late to be recruited. The big name schools in some cases will have their rosters filled but a large majority of the recruiting process takes place during the senior year. Roughly 8% of college programs make their final recruiting decisions after January 1 of the student-athlete’s senior year and well into the summer.

Ask our Scouting Team a Question- 1-800-977-9149

Recruiting Profile: http://bit.ly/BeRecruited